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Shannah Laumeister on Bert Stern: Original Madman by Bill Biss

Shannah Laumeister on Bert Stern: Original Madman by Bill Biss

Shannah Laumeister on Bert Stern: Original Madman by Bill Biss originally published in ShowBiss. 

Now and for some time, Shannah Laumeister has been Mrs. Bert Stern. In 2013, I interviewed her for a very special reason. Laumeister had just released a documentary film and a brilliant one at that… on Bert Stern. Stern was a remarkable photographer of the first caliber and her partner in life at this time. You wouldn’t imagine how many famous people he’s had the pleasure of photographing… but to drop just one name; is Marilyn Monroe. Her documentary is titled Bert Stern: Original Madman. There are many incredible photos to discover through his skills and many indelible moments to discover from a realistic and loving portrait of Stern from Laumeister. (Bert Stern died a few months after this interview). Her love for him lives on.

He's So Violet Bert Stern by Christine Whitney

He's So Violet Bert Stern by Christine Whitney

He's So Violet Bert Stern by Christine Whitney originally published in Violet Grey. 

An intimate look into the private life and mind of the formidable photographer.
Bert Stern’s success began with a martini. As the story goes, in 1955, the 24-year-old photographer was commissioned to shoot a vodka campaign for Smirnoff. The resulting image, a seductive shot of a martini glass juxtaposed with an Egyptian pyramid, launched a creative revolution in advertising as well as Stern’s career, which spanned more than 50 years.
Vanity Fair Italia June 2018

Marcello Mastroianni by Bert Stern in Vanity Fair Italia

Bert Stern's portrait of Marcello Mastroianni in Vanity Fair Italia's June 2018 issue.
"Shapes & Symbols" Press Release from Galerie 36

"Shapes & Symbols" Press Release from Galerie 36

Galerie 36 is pleased to present the first comprehensive exhibition of the visionary advertising photographs of American photographer Bert Stern (1929 - 2013) from the early fifties to the early seventies. The exhibition "Shapes & Symbols” shows a selection of iconic images that emerged during the highly productive time of his rise to become one of the top advertising photographers. Many of the works exhibited have never before been publicly displayed outside publications and magazines of their time and can now be seen for the first time in terms of their artistic value.
Christy's Art Center Displays Bert Stern's Stills and Sketches in "Lolita in Sag Harbor" by Stephanie Murg

Christy's Art Center Displays Bert Stern's Stills and Sketches in "Lolita in Sag Harbor" by Stephanie Murg

Christy's Art Center Displays Bert Stern's Stills and Sketches in "Lolita in Sag Harbor" by Stephanie Murg originally published in Hamptons Magazine. 

“Lolita in Sag Harbor” explores an iconic movie image in the place where it came to life.

Little-known fact: The famous poster image of Sue Lyon, star of Stanley Kubrick’s 1962 film Lolita—with heartshaped sunglasses, pursed lips, and lollipop, all gleaming cherry-red— was created in Sag Harbor. The sultry publicity stills shot by legendary photographer Bert Stern are now on display, with his sketches and notes, at Christy’s Art Center.

The Search for Love and Lolita in Sag Harbor by Annette Hinkle

The Search for Love and Lolita in Sag Harbor by Annette Hinkle

The Search for Love and Lolita in Sag Harbor by Annette Hinkle originally published in Sag Harbor Express.

In the summer of 1961, photographer Bert Stern traveled from New York City to Sag Harbor with a 15-year old actress and her mother.

The trio stayed at the home of stylist Nancy Pearl and her husband, Arnold, and for the next seven days, Stern shot countless roles of film of the young actress in various Sag Harbor locations — on the porch of The American Hotel, in front of Barons Cove Inn, and through the mullioned-windowed door of the long-gone Bayview Hotel (now the site of People’s United bank).

Finally, he took the young actress to Pierson High School where he photographed her in a car after outfitting her with a series of all-American props he had picked up at the Sag Harbor Variety store, including lollipops, American flags, and a 39-cent pair of red heart shaped glasses.

Film Review: Bert Stern: Original Mad Man

Film Review: Bert Stern: Original Mad Man

The photographer Bert Stern claims that the only truly great portrait of a movie star was the famously stark 1929 Edward Steichen image of Garbo with her hair severely pulled back, revealing that immortal face. He set about to do the same for Marilyn Monroe on a Vogue commission and, especially with the winsome yet haunting nude poses shot shortly before her death in her last sitting, achieved his goal.

Bert Stern: Original Mad Man, a terrific, jaw-droppingly candid documentary made by his longtime lover, Shanna Laumeister, covers this heady episode, which took place in a champagne-soaked hotel suite, in depth, but also reveals that Stern, born in 1929, was so much more than Monroe’s greatest, most intimate photographer. One of the absolute original Mad Men, he made his name in the 1950s with a remarkable series of Smirnoff vodka ads—notably one taken in front of the pyramids—which not only revolutionized ad imaging, but also turned the world into vodka drinkers. Coming from humble, non-artistic Jewish origins, at his height he ran a bustling studio that was a nonstop creative assembly line of photo and commercial film shoots.

The Quiet Man by Jeffery Wells

The Quiet Man by Jeffery Wells

I wasn’t expecting much from Shannah Laumeister‘s Bert Stern: Original MadMan. Everybody knows Stern as the sharpie who took those legendary semi-nude snaps of Marilyn Monroe (i,e. “The Last Sitting“) a few weeks before she died, but I didn’t know anything about Stern, the man. (Or madman.) But I wanted to.

Laumeister’s film started off like a typical blowjob profile so right away I was antsy. It showed Stern attending a Manhattan art-gallery exhibition of his work and being glad-handed by the swells and the hangers-on. And then a series of reputable authorities began telling Shannah what a visionary fellow Stern is/was/will always be. Blah blah blah.

But then it shifted gears and Stern started telling the story of his life, and before I knew it I was hooked. I began to feel relaxed with the guy and those big sad eyes and that quiet, low-key, matter-of-fact way of speaking. And then I began to learn about what he’s done and I realized soon enough that Stern really was one of the biggest portrait photography and zeitgeist-capturing ad visionaries of the ’50s, ’60s and ’70s. And perhaps one of the great nookie kings of that era. Jesus God, a kid in a candy store!

Bert Stern: Original Mad Man by Daniel Harling

Bert Stern: Original Mad Man by Daniel Harling

If the plaudits are to be believed, Bert Stern is the man who, amongst other things, revolutionised American advertising in the 1950s; initiated the relationship between Richard Burton and Elizabeth Taylor and inspired America to become a nation of vodka drinkers.

He also found time to father three children, have a string of marriages and divorces and photograph just about anybody who was anybody. His extensive career and personal life are portrayed in BERT STERN: ORIGINAL MADMAN through a combination of interviews, home-movies, still photographs and stock footage.